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    HOW TO MAINTAIN YOUR NEWLY BOUGHT CAR
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    With contemporary cars we do not think it necessary to look for fault and sustainable means to maintain it in order to keep it going. Changing the spark plugs, breaker points, and condenser used to be a seasonal exercise, and body rust was accepted as a normal life changing status of the car. Chases and suspensions treated with oil and rust through warranties typically run from eight years or longer.

    Below are some simple but critical check and regulations you should do to help you keep up with your new car.

    CHECK THE ENGINE OIL:
    This is supposed to be a regular exercise and routinely should be a monthly practice, mostly if you notice an oil leak. It should be a sign to check and make changes.
    To check the oil level, the car should be packed on a level ground to get the accurate dipstick reading of the oil level. Make sure you do not over-fill, and if you have a leak try and find and fix quickly.

    TIRE AIR PRESSURE CHECK:
    This should be done before any extended road trips, do not forget to use an accurate tire pressure gauge to check the inflation pressure in each tire including the spare tires.

    Do this when the tires are cold or when the car has been driven or after within a mile of speedy ride. The recommended pressure is usually found on the manual given to the owner.

    Also, inspect the tire for uneven cut and try to detect on-the-spot wear and tear effect before getting out on the road.

    WASH THE CAR ALWAYS:
    It is advisable to wash the car every week if you can do that. Wash the body very well and hose out the fender wells and undercarriage to remove dirt and road salt. (Follow us here and we will tread HOW TO WASH YOUR CAR, to avoid WAX; fat substances that sticks and make it look odds).

    INSPECT THE AIR FILTER:
    Remove the air filter element and hold it up to a light very strong, if you see no transparent light through, replace it no matter what.

    CHECK THE CV-BOOTS (constant-velocity-joint-boots):
    This is located on the drive axles for front-wheel-drive and some four-wheel-drive vehicles, always examine this bellows-like rubber boots.
    If dirt contaminates the CV joint it can quickly lead to an expensive fix so, immediately replace any one that you see cut, leaking or is cracked.

    DO NOT NEGLECT THE EXHAUST SYSTEM:
    You should be willing to make under-inspection for your car and try to replace any cracked part, but mostly advised to replace the entire exhaust system as it gets better replacing the whole system than patching.

    BRAKES:
    If you are among the people who handle their own break-check please, remove all wheels and examine the brake system. Replace excessively worn pads or linings, and have badly scored rotors or drums machined.

    Break-check should be twice a year and more often if you drive a lot of miles, which means you are among the commuter drivers or is always on the road.

    RADIATOR MUST BE CLEANED:
    Wash the outside of the radiator with soft detergent and prevent debris with a soft brush.

    MAKE THOROUGH CHECK OF THE BATERY:
    The battery terminals should be inspected to make sure they are well connected and with no corrosion. In warmer climates, it is necessary to check the fluid level every few months if the battery has removable caps.

    SOME REGULAR MAINTENANCE CULTURE FOR EVERY TWO TO FOUR YEARS
    Change the Automatic-Transmission Fluid: =>
    In many models, it required that you replace the fluid and filter every 36,000 miles—sooner, if the normally pink fluid takes on a brownish tint. With some cars the filter can go 100,000 miles or more. And, in the case of other late models, the transmission fluid never needs to be changed. Please, try checking your own manual for this information.

    Drive Belts and Hoses :=>
    This should be done every two to three years, even if they do not show any wear. And, if a belt becomes noisy, please, have it adjusted.

    The Timing Belt Should Be Changed :=>
    The manufacturers have their recommended replacement interval of timing belt—usually every 60,000 to 80,000 miles. And if your vehicle has a belt instead of a chain, try to stick to the recommendation of the manufacturers. Check the manual or consult a dealer. NOTE THIS: If you fail to change the timing belt, do not be surprised, it will lead to a very expensive engine repair if the belt should break.
    Thank you for reading!

    Date:--2018-05-26 18:54:50

    By:--ridihow

ShortCuts To Articles

HOW TO MAINTAIN YOUR NEWLY BOUGHT CAR
Date-posted:--2018-05-26 18:55:46

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